Mind-modelling and Questions in the Classroom

In the previous post we introduced the concept of ‘mind-modelling’ (Stockwell 2009): the process by which we consciously and unconsciously construct what we think other people, characters or animals are thinking. If you like, you can read that post in full here. The most important point is that mind-modelling highlights that we only actually have… Continue reading Mind-modelling and Questions in the Classroom

Mind-modelling and classroom interaction

In this post we are going to step back from the literature classroom specifically to explore what a concept from cognitive linguistics – mind-modelling – can offer to our understanding of classroom discourse, both in English and across the school. Mind-modelling (Stockwell 2009) Rooted in cognitive research on Theory of Mind (Premack and Woodruff 1978),… Continue reading Mind-modelling and classroom interaction

‘Why aren’t we watering the concrete? The value of linguistics and critical pedagogy to the teacher’, by @EGH324 student Isobel Wood

One of us (@DrofletJess) has been running a third year undergraduate module exploring current research and debates around English Education this semester at the University of Sheffield, UK. We felt that some of the students’ submissions would be of huge value and interest to the wider English Education community and as such we are featuring… Continue reading ‘Why aren’t we watering the concrete? The value of linguistics and critical pedagogy to the teacher’, by @EGH324 student Isobel Wood

‘You’re an English student who doesn’t read?’ by @EGH324 student Kathryn Jamshidi

This university semester one of us (Jess Mason – @DrofletJess) has been running a third year undergraduate module at the University of Sheffield called Language and Literature in the Classroom: you can see live tweets from the lectures at @EGH324. The module is a research-driven exploration of current issues and debates in English education. For… Continue reading ‘You’re an English student who doesn’t read?’ by @EGH324 student Kathryn Jamshidi

Transactions and worlds: Reading, interpretation and meaning

In this post, we step away from our previous few topics and come back to a question that we believe is a crucial one for anyone interested in the study of literature in schools: how does meaning arise? Not an easy question to answer, but in the light of recent curriculum reform in English, debates… Continue reading Transactions and worlds: Reading, interpretation and meaning

Reading identity: experience, expertise and preference

In schools in England, class readers are typically read incrementally for a portion of each lesson, preceded by an introduction to the day’s reading and followed by a task related to the section that has been read. As a result, reading the book itself can become a lengthy process. This means that students’ experiences of… Continue reading Reading identity: experience, expertise and preference